MSIC >> Offerings and Capabilites
LAESI-MSI:
Protea's MSIC provides direct identification and characterization of biological samples through its proprietary LAESI DP-1000 Direct Ionization System interfaced with linear ion trap technology or ion mobility TOF. Using the native water contained in a biological sample in combination with a mid-IR laser, LAESI-MSI eliminates the need for sample preparation and allows you to study the biochemical landscape of your sample as it exists in nature. Services are available for 2D and 3D tissue biomolecular distribution profiling, high throughput biofluid analysis, biodynamic live cell colony monitoring, and material characterization. LAESI-MSI services bring a whole new dimension to your data analysis and radically improve the throughput of your projects.

MALDI-MSI:
MSIC offers MALDI imaging with 100µm spatial resolution using an AB Sciex™ 4800 TOF/TOF mass spectrometer. Post-processing of acquired data is performed using TissueView™ software to view collected mass spectra and generate ion maps of peaks of interest. Using Protea's proprietary matrix preparations, MALDI matrix applications are performed using sublimation for even homogenous coatings. Additionally, manual airbrush spraying for tissues that require better analyte extraction is available.

Tissue Sample Preparation:
The MSIC team has the capabilities and the tools to prepare biological samples for complex imaging projects. The following approaches are some of the typical technologies used in the pre/post-imaging phase:
  • Cryosectioning of tissues on a Leica CM3050S cryostat for preparation of 5-300 µm thick sections
  • Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E;) Staining for optical visualization of reference tissue sections.
  • Nissl/cresyl violet staining for optical visualization of tissue anatomical structure after mass spectrometry imaging.
  • Freezing Techniques:
    • -80°C slow freeze:
    • Submersion directly into liquid nitrogen
    • Liquid nitrogen "slow freeze"
    • Isopetane/liquid nitrogen freeze:
...imaging the future of biology